Download No Pata Pata Video – Angelique Kidjo, Remake Of Miriam Makeba’s Pata Pata To Spread Word On Coronavirus

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Scroll down and Download No Pata Pata Video – Angelique Kidjo, Revised Version Of Miriam Makeba’s Pata Pata.

Super talented African Multi-Grammy award-winning Musician, Angelique Kidjo has re-released Late Miriam Makeba’s famous Pata Pata, a South African dance hit from the 1960s, with new lyrics to spread information about coronavirus to vulnerable communities.

Download No Pata Pata Video - Angelique Kidjo, Revised Version Of Miriam Makeba's Pata Pata

Beninese born Angélique kidjo shared the song on her social page with the following caption:

UNICEF has asked me to sing a version of #MiriamMakeba ‘s Pata Pata with new lyrics to convey the #covid_19 health messages.
The song will be broadcast on radio stations in Africa to people who don’t have access to regular media.
‘Pata Pata’ makes everyone want to show off their dance moves! So please film yourself dancing tagging @unicefafrica on Instagram or @1unicefafrica on TikTok with #nopatapata, please. The best dance clips will make it into a UNICEF music video coming mid-May!
You can find the full track here:
https://uni.cf/PataPata

nopatapata #safehands coronavirus @UNICEFAfrica #healthyathome

Download No Pata Pata Video below

Pata means “touch touch” but the singer is singing No Pata Pata which means “No touch touch.” The message is we shouldn’t be touching our face or touching others (physical distancing) at this particular moment.

 It includes lyrics such as, “We need to keep our hands clean so ‘no-Pata Pata’… Don’t touch your face, keep distance please, and ‘no-Pata Pata’”.

Download No Pata Pata Video - Angelique Kidjo,
Miriam Makeba, vocal, performs at the Africa Festival in Delft, the Netherlands on 4th August 1990. (Photo by Frans Schellekens/Redferns)

According to the United Nations children’s agency, Unicef, which organized the release, the song will be played on more than 15 radio stations across African countries.

“It sounds so simple and yet it’s still really difficult to get information out to people in the most remote areas or to people who aren’t online,” said Unicef spokesman James Elder. He added that the song is also meant to spread joy in hard times, he said

The late Miriam Makeba was a friend and mentor to Kidjo. She was also a Unicef goodwill ambassador and one of the biggest African celebrities of the last decade. Speaking to BBC Focus on Africa, Kidjo said she regrets that Makeba is not here. Kidjo said she would have been more than willing to do the song because she was a mother who loved to see people happy.

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